Frequently Asked Questions - Income

It depends on the public position for which you are filing.

Most filers disclose all sources of income, regardless of the amount of income received from the source. However, the following filers are only required to disclose sources of income valued at over $500:

  • Trustee for a College or University;
  • City Elected Officer, Candidate, or Appointee in a position paid less than $16,000 per year;
  • Member of the Board of Directors of a Sanitary District; or
  • Member, Candidate, or Appointee to a position on a School District Board of Education or ESC Governing Board.

R.C. 102.02(A)(2)(b); R.C. 102.022(A).

“Income” is defined in R.C. 102.01(E). It includes:

  • "Gross income” as defined and used in the “Internal Revenue Code of 1986,” 100 Stat. 2085, 26 U.S.C. 1, as amended;
  • Interest and dividends on obligations or securities of any state or of any political subdivision or authority of any state or political subdivision; and
  • Interest and dividends on obligations of any authority, commission, or instrumentality of the United States.

“Gross income” is defined in the Internal Revenue Code, 26 USC 61, to include all income from whatever source derived, including but not limited to:

  • Compensation for services, including fees, commissions, fringe benefits, and similar items;
  • Gross income derived from business;
  • Gains derived from dealings in property;
  • Interest;
  • Rents;
  • Royalties;
  • Dividends;
  • Alimony and separate maintenance payments;
  • Annuities;
  • Income from life insurance and endowment contracts;
  • Pensions;
  • Income from the discharge of indebtedness;
  • Distributive share of a partnership gross income;
  • Income in respect of decedent; and
  • Income from an interest in an estate or trust.

If you considered a particular item of income to be gross income for federal tax purposes, regardless of whether you ultimately paid taxes on the item, you should disclose the source of the item on your Financial Disclosure Statement.

If the funds are gross income as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. Some of these items may be gross income. For example, unemployment benefits are generally gross income. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If the funds are gross income as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. Some of these items may be gross income. For example, unemployment benefits are generally gross income. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If the funds are “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If the prize is “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If the prize is “gross income,” you would disclose the source (Ohio Lottery, ABC Casino, raffle organizer, etc.) and the fact that it is a prize on your FDS.

If the child support is “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If you receive the proceeds of a life insurance policy, and they are “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If the insurance proceeds are gross income, you would disclose both the name of the policyholder and the insurance company as the source of the proceeds.

As long as the rolled over interest or earnings are not considered “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code in the year when you roll them over, you are not required to disclose the source of the earnings on your disclosure statement. You will be required to disclose the investments on this statement as investments regardless of whether you receive income from them.

When you decide to take any disbursals or earnings from an investment, you are required to disclose the source of the item if it is considered “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

If all, or a portion, of the scholarship or grant is “gross income” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, you must disclose the source of the income on your FDS. For guidance on this question, you may wish to contact the IRS or a tax professional.

The answer depends on both the public position you hold and the source of the income.

Public position:

You are never required to disclose the amount of income you receive from a source if you are filing the statement because you are a member of the board of trustees of a state college or university, or are an officer, employee, or candidate for an elected office in a political subdivision, and the compensation for the position you hold is less than $16,000 annually. R.C. 102.022.

Source of income:

If you are filing the statement because you hold any other public position, you are not required to disclose the amount of income received from a source unless you know or have reason to know that the source is doing or seeking to do business of any kind with your public agency, or is a legislative agent. R.C. 102.02(A)(2)(b)(i).

Yes. You are required to disclose every source of income received during the preceding calendar year in your own name or by any other person for your use or benefit. Because you earned income from both a public employer and a private employer during the year for which you are filing, you must disclose both as sources of income.

Yes. You are required to disclose the amount of income received from your private employer, or any other source of income, if the source is doing or seeking to do business with the public agency you served. R.C. 102.02(A)(2)(b)(i).

You are required to disclose both the trust, and the sources of income to the trust, as sources of income to you. Adv. Op. No. 2005-01.

You are usually not required to disclose your spouse’s sources of income on your financial disclosure statement. Unless his income is earned for your use or benefit (for example: it is paid by his employer into a trust and you are the beneficiary of the trust), you are not required to disclose your spouse’s employer as a source of income to you. Even if your spouse’s check is direct deposited into your joint account, it is not being paid to him for your use or benefit, and you do not have to disclose his employer as a source of income. Adv. Op. No. 75-036.

Whoever pays the income to you is the source of the income. If your tenant pays rent, or someone else pays on their behalf, and the payments are made directly to you, you would disclose the tenant or person paying on their behalf as the source of income.

If the tenant pays rent to an LLC or corporation, and the LLC or corporation pays you, you would disclose the LLC or corporation as the source of income. Either way, you would disclose “rental property” as the service provided.